A Complete Guide About How To Fill Screw Holes In Wall?

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how to fill screw holes in wall

There are two main reasons why you should fill holes in the wall. The first is to cover up the hole made by your screws or nails or other heavy objects, and the other reason is that no one will re-use a screw hole if it has been filled. In most cases, filing a screw hole involves simply inserting some filler into it and then wiping off any excess filler from around the edge of the screw hole.

The process of filling a screw hole requires patience, but once you have done it a couple of times, you will get better at saving time. To make it easier for you, here are two methods on how to fill a screw hole:

Method 1

1. Putty drywall hole Repair

If you have a bunch of screws sticking up from the wall in your home, chances are there’s a corresponding divot in your wall where that screw is anchored. While these holes may not be visible once everything on the wall is put back into place (such as pictures and mirrors), they can still be unsightly and create bumps for those who run into them. Fortunately, it is possible to fill the holes by using an epoxy-based filler found at most hardware stores.

Material

  • 3M Very Fast Grab 3501 Acrylic Adhesive (used as threadlocker)
  • 5S Red Samurai  3M  3569 Plastic Epoxy Putty – 2 Pack

2. Preparation

The first step is to gather the necessary materials. This includes a drill, screwdriver, epoxy putty, sandpaper (fine grit), masking tape, and newspaper. If you’re using the 3M Very Fast Grab 3501 Acrylic Adhesive, you’ll also need an applicator bottle.

3. Drilling the Hole

The next step is to drill the hole. You’ll want to use a drill bit that’s slightly smaller than the width of the screw head. This will ensure a tight fit and help with stability once the filler is in place. Be sure to drill into the wall at an angle so that the hole is wider on the bottom than on top. This will allow more room for the epoxy to be inserted.

  1. After drilling a hole in your wall, remove all dust from the hole using a dry cloth or air compressor.
  2. Put some masking tape onto the newspaper, and place it on top of the screw so that it covers the head and about 1/8″ (~3mm) past the end of the screw point (see image above). This will prevent the excess filler from getting into your wall and will provide you with a clean surface once everything is done.

4. Attaching Applicator Bottle

This step only applies if you’re using 3M Very Fast Grab 3501 Acrylic Adhesive (thread locker).

If you are using the 3M Very Fast Grab 3501 Acrylic Adhesive, you must attach the applicator bottle. This is done by first removing the black cap and then the white plastic insert. You will then need to cut the small red straw to be about 1/4″ (~6mm) taller than the hole. You can do this by making a small cut on one side of the straw and then pushing it into the hole until it’s completely inserted. Reattach the white plastic insert once it’s in place and replace the black cap.

5. Filling the Hole

Now it’s time to fill the hole. This can be done with either your hands or with an applicator bottle. If using your hands, take a small amount of epoxy putty and roll it into a ball. Then, press it into the hole until it’s flush with the wall. If using an applicator bottle, dispense a small amount of epoxy putty onto the screw head. Using the straw attached to the applicator bottle, insert it into the hole and squeeze the bottle until the epoxy putty is forced into the hole.

6. Removing Excess Putty

Once the hole has been filled, use a piece of sandpaper to lightly sand over the top of the putty. This will help remove any excess putty and will create a smooth surface. If you’re using the 3M Very Fast Grab 3501 Acrylic Adhesive, you can also use a brush to apply it over the top of the putty.

7. Letting the Putty Cure

Once everything is sanded and cleaned up, it’s time to let the epoxy putty cure. This usually takes around 24 hours. During this time, be sure not to disturb the area and keep it free from dust or debris.

8. Finishing Up

Once the epoxy putty has cured, you can remove the masking tape and newspaper from the screw head and wall. If desired, you can then paint over the area to match the rest of your wall. And that’s it! You’ve successfully filled and repaired a screw hole in your wall.

Method 2

Here is the second method of filling screw holes in the wall.

1. Buy filler

You can choose from different fillers, but since you are trying to fill a screw hole, I would suggest using spackling paste. Spackling paste fills the walls and smooths out the surface of your patched wall.

2. Buy A Spoon

You will need a spoon to scoop the spackling and filling into your filler bucket and then mix it up so that it is not too chunky or too thin.

3. Mix The Filler And Paste To Achieve The Right Consistency

For your filler to be easy to apply, make sure there isn’t excess water in it because this could make your patching job much more difficult. If there is too much water in the mixture, you may need to add some filler. If there is not enough water in the mixture, you want to add more paste.

4. Plastic Putty Knife

Make sure that your plastic putty knife has a long handle because this will make it easier for you to apply filler into your screw holes. Also, you will want to use the flat end of the putty knife when applying it to the spackle.

5. Apply A Thicker Filler To Bigger Holes And Dents

When there is a big hole or dent at hand, try using an epoxy-filled caulk since these are thicker than other fillers, and they dry up pretty fast too! There are also ready-mixed spackling compounds available for purchase that will work great for bigger holes and dents.

6. Apply A Thin Layer Of Filler To Smaller Holes And Dents

If you deal with smaller holes and dents, you can use a lightweight spackling paste to patch it up. This type of filler is easy to apply and sand down so that your screw hole is not noticeable.

7. Let The Filler Dry Completely Before Sanding It Down

Make sure that you give the filler enough time to dry before sanding it down otherwise, and your job won’t look as neat as you want it to be.

8. Use Fine-Grit Sandpaper For A Neater Finish

When sanding down your filler, make sure that you use fine-grit sandpaper so that the surface is smooth and even.

9. Paint Over The Filler If You Wish

After your filler has been sanded down, you can go ahead and paint over it if you want to conceal the fix.

10. Wait For The Paint To Dry Before Moving On To The Next Step

Ensure that the paint is completely dry before you start putting objects or screws back into the filled screw hole.

11. Putty Knife/Rag

For you to have a neater finish, use a putty knife or a rag to apply pressure onto the patched area so that the filler is pushed down and any bumps or lumps are removed.

12. Apply A Thin Layer Of Filler To The Underside Of Your Screw Head

If you have a screw sticking out of your wall, make sure that you fill in the undersides with some filler so that the screw will sit flush against the wall.

13. Let The Filler Dry Completely Before Sanding It Down

Make sure that you give the filler enough time to dry before sanding it down otherwise, and your job won’t look as neat as you want it to be.

14. Use Fine-Grit Sandpaper For A Neater Finish

When sanding down your filler, make sure that you use fine-grit sandpaper so that the surface is smooth and even.

15. Paint Over The Filler If You Wish

After your filler has been sanded down, you can go ahead and paint over it if you want to conceal the fix.

16. Wait For The Paint To Dry Before Moving On To The Next Step

Ensure that the paint is completely dry before you start putting objects or screws back into the filled screw hole.

FAQs

  • What is the best way to fill screw holes in a wall?

There are a few ways to fill screw holes in a wall: using caulk, putty, or wood filler. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages.

Caulk is easy to use and dries quickly, but it can be messy and difficult to apply evenly. Putty is also easy to use and dries quickly, but it can be challenging to get the correct consistency. Wood filler is more challenging to use than caulking or putty, but it does not shrink as much as other methods, and it can be stained or painted to match the surrounding wood.

  • 2. What should I do if the hole is too big to fill with caulk?

If the hole is too large for caulk, it might be best to use more durable filler such as putty or wood filler. However, do not try to patch the screw hole with another screw; the second screw will only cause the problem of improperly filled holes to persist and may even make it worse by stripping out more of your wall.

  • 3. Is there anything I can use instead of wood filler?

Many products on the market serve as substitutes for wood filler: spackle, liquid nails, and siliconized acrylic caulk all provide similar functions and can be used in place of wood filler. Spackling is easy to apply and dries quickly, but it is not durable and can easily be scratched or chipped. Liquid nails are more durable than spackle, but it takes longer to dry and can be challenging to apply evenly. Siliconized acrylic caulk is the most durable of the three, but it can be challenging to apply and shrink over time.

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